This topic contains 24 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Zoodulcis 2 days, 11 hours ago.

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  • #1157

    Arachniac1
    Participant
    Critter Gold

    Winston, Galaxy and Bucket doing their best totem pole!  Whites tree frogs.

  • #1256

    Zoodulcis
    Moderator

    This is an amazing picture!  Do they do this often?  If so, do you have any idea what is behind this behavior?

  • #1272

    Arachniac1
    Participant

    They do it occassionally, usually in doubles, this was the first time I’d seen all three do it!

  • #1283

    Zoodulcis
    Moderator

    Any idea why they do this?  Their names seem to indicate they are all males, so I’m tentatively ruling out mating behavior.

  • #1286

    Arachniac1
    Participant

    Actually I’m not sure of the sexes, their still sub-adult and haven’t started vocalizing yet. They are a very social species, always hanging out together and this may have something to do with it. My other adults (2.1) also do this in varying order of who’s on top also so don’t believe it’s mating behavior.  It is directly under the basking light so might be a dominance thing or last on top gets the heat!  They are very comical!

  • #1287

    Zoodulcis
    Moderator

    What a hoot!  Possibly using the other guy to bet closer to the warmth.  They are a social species, aren’t they!  I never realized.  How did you get into raising/owning this particular species?

  • #1307

    Arachniac1
    Participant

    I saw a few on youtube and liked their funny personalities, and the fact their social.  I have 3 different morphs, Watson (in the middle) is a normal, Galaxy (on top) is a super snowflake,, and Bucket is a blue-eyed honey Whites tree frog. These guys are from Australia but there is a sub-species very similar from Indonesia.

  • #1308

    Zoodulcis
    Moderator

    Thanks for clarifying who is who.  So these jokers attracted you to them by force of personality.  Good to know!  Sometimes forum readers ask what other readers and the moderators think about this and that species, and I know very little about these guys, so now I am the wiser.  Were they hard to acquire?  Did they come from US breeders?

  • #1311

    Arachniac1
    Participant

    The honey snowflake blue-eyed is very rare and the super snowflake is rare and they came from a breeder. Watson I got at a Repticon as a 3/4″ froglet for $15. All 3 are captive bred.  The normals and even the low expression snowflakes are pretty easy to find, even places like Petco occassionally have them. They are easy to care for, need 20 gallon high for 1 frog and 10 gallons for each extra frog.  I keep mine in an a 36″hx24″wx18″d cage.  Mine is bioactive and planted with lots of corkbark hides and logs to climb with a big water bowl for soaking. They are forest frogs and only require 30-50% RH, not a real wet environment. And a basking area of about 86f with a cool side of  mid 70s.  I feed crickets and roaches, and they are very comical eaters–clamoring over each others to get into the roach bowl. I let them hunt the crickets for their enrichment and my own amusement! Here’s a better picture of Bucket, the blue-eyed honey snowflake.

  • #1326

    Zoodulcis
    Moderator

    Are the snowflake and blue-eyed considered morphs of a wild type?  Sorry to be so ignorant of these things.  The only amphibians I have kept are axolotls.  I’m starting to consider acquiring some of these guys one day.  Do you mind sharing the cost of the rare ones?  Where you happy with the breeder?

  • #1338

    Arachniac1
    Participant

    They blue-eyed honey and the snowflakes are selectively bred for, they don’t occur naturally, that I know of.  The normals go for between $15 and 35, depending on size and if captive bred or wild caught. The regular (low expression) snowflakes go for about $35-75, again depending on size. The super snowflakes go for $100-200 depending on how flaked they are. And for Bucket, the blue-eyed honey snowflake, she was about $325 since she’s one of the rarest combos. I liked the breeder I got them from. He grows by @thetreefrogcollective on IG.

  • #1363

    Zoodulcis
    Moderator

    Thank you for that information on pricing.  There is indeed quite a range!  Is there anything tricky about their husbandry that you have discovered that may not be common knowledge?

  • #1370

    Arachniac1
    Participant

    No,  I’d say they are very easy to care for. Just keep their soaking bowl clean and full with spring water (ideally) or treated tap water to remove chlorine etc.  You can mist at night if you need a humidity boost, but don’t keep it over 50% humidity because they can get skin infections in wet habitats. Always house same sized frogs together… They are big eaters and if it fits in their mouth, they might try to eat a tankmate! Keeping in atleast a group of 2 or more is appreciated!

  • #1419

    Zoodulcis
    Moderator

    Thank you for that input on humidity.  Many new amphibians keepers might make the mistake of over misting.

    So companions are appreciated, as long as they are the same size.  Does gender matter?  Also, what is their most favorite food?  Besides crickets, of course!

  • #1423

    Arachniac1
    Participant

    Males and females can be kept together without fear of unwanted babies, and there’s no need to worry about ratios of males to females. Basically for them to breed they need to be kept in a rain chamber.

    As for food,  they’ll eat any insects that are no bigger than the width between their eyes.  I give free range crickets to hunt and rotate between roaches, superworms, cut up night crawlers and treats like wax and horn worms.   I dust with Repashy Calcium plus a couple times a week (more often for babies).   They are eager eaters, occassionally grabbing a tank mate if in the way of the food. Mine seem to have a pecking order at the roach bowl…. Bucket and Galaxy go first and Watson sits back and watches the show till its his tern! I feed mine every other day (their almost 4″s, so sub-adult). They are prone to obesity, so keep them on a diet so they don’t turn into pudgy frogs!

  • #1424

    Arachniac1
    Participant

    This is a picture of Galaxy with some of his snowflakes, most are on his back.

  • #1436

    Zoodulcis
    Moderator

    I can see where Galaxy inspired that name.   Really beautiful coloration.  A couple of questions, if you don’t mind…What is a rain chamber and are you ever concerned about parasites when feeding wild caught fodder?

  • #1446

    Arachniac1
    Participant
    1. As far as I’ve heard, a rain chamber basically reproduces a heavy rain, which is the only time these frogs get “in the mood.”  It basically is a tank with an inch or two of water on the bottom and a pump that produces a heavy rain.   That’s all I know about them!  As for food all the food I feed is commercially bred, I don’t feed anything from the wild.  I also check for parasites regardless with a fecal at my exotic vet yearly just to be sure!
  • #1469

    Zoodulcis
    Moderator

    Arachniac, you have been a real wealth of information and thank you so much.  Since it can sometimes be hard to get veterinarians to publish prices on services, can you mention the cost of this yearly fecal?  I assume you have all three done separately.

  • #1477

    Arachniac1
    Participant

    I’m glad to share info on these goofey amphibians! My vet charges $25 per fecal plus a single office visit fee of $45.

  • #1502

    Zoodulcis
    Moderator

    So in essence, $110 yearly to certify your totem pole parasite free.  Have they always been cleared (which I assume they have except maybe right after you received them)?

  • #1503

    Arachniac1
    Participant

    Since they were all captive bred they have always been negative.   The wild caught ones are usually parasite riddled when they are imported, so they usually need to be dewormed.  I don’t know the cost since I only buy cb animals and have never had to deworm one.

  • #1506

    Zoodulcis
    Moderator

    Would you mind terribly if I quoted you on your experience with CB vs. wild caught and parasites?  This sort of experience from a forum participant and not a Ph.D. moderator and writer of the reptile and amphibian care guides might be more compelling to certain new keepers than the opinion of anyone formally connected to the site. As a  zoologist and natural resource (wildlife) specialist, I am very professional in my approach to husbandry, but a forum participant not viewed as being ensconced in an ivory tower might be more appealing to certain newbies.  If this would be OK, please tell me how to quote (give credit) to you properly?

  • #1511

    Arachniac1
    Participant

    Sure, you can quote me. I have over 25 years experience dealing with all sorts of Reptiles and amphibians, both WC, FB and CB. I treat the farm bred as wild caught as I find they tend to carry parasites too.  You can credit me as Jill Peters, owner Green Flag Reptiles.

  • #1548

    Zoodulcis
    Moderator

    Thank you Jill, that is very helpful of you!