Topics Forums Ball Pythons Pastel butter genetic stripe yellow belly ball python

This topic contains 6 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Zoodulcis 1 week, 5 days ago.

  • Author
    Posts 2 Favorite
  • #777

    PadgettSquad3
    Participant
    Pastel butter genetic stripe yellow belly ball python

    This is Mocha. She is the sweestest snake in the world! She is so gentle and kind! She loves to snuggle and give kisses 💋

  • #780

    Zoodulcis
    Moderator

    She is absolutely stunning!  Makes me miss my ball python, gone lo these many years.  Does she like to crawl under clothing and come peaking out of a sleeve or neckline as a joke.  I swear mine had a sense of humor.  Does she truly like crickets?

  • #784

    PadgettSquad3
    Participant

    She is a show stopper lol People love her! She loves to be in my shirt! She will either come out the sleve or neck and just chill out. She is such a sweetheart. No she does not eat crickets lol but they had a section for ball pythons so i figured i would show her off 😊 We have 2 others also! Another just Genetic Stripe and a Black Axanthic.

  • #788

    Zoodulcis
    Moderator

    I don’t know about you, but I find snakes to be extremely calming.  I have always loved them.  I must have the gene, because although my parents loathed snakes, my cousin became a herpetologist.  So it’s in there somewhere.  I am an expert in the human-animal bond and one of the most fun studies I ran across in the course of my doctoral dissertation was the beneficial effects of a pet snake on physiological stress response.  If you are interested I will post the citation in this forum. You all seem like the sort of folks that might resonate with this.

  • #792

    PadgettSquad3
    Participant

    Yes that would be awesome! I was terrified of snakes before we got our girls! They truely changed how i feel about them!

  • #793

    Zoodulcis
    Moderator

    You got it!  Please look for the citation in a post that I will supply early tomorrow morning.  And kudos to you for getting over any fear of snakes.  I never had one, which makes me kinda weird.  To prove that point, I also saw a study where there was an attractive woodland scene that was highly rated by viewers as to pleasing aesthetic qualities.  When a figure of a snake, so disguised by the grasses and underbrush of the same scene that almost none of it was visible, but a bit was, was photoshopped in study participants rated the scene as much less pleasing, although they did not know why.  Wait, what!  So your reaction to ophidians is/was much more normal than mine!

  • #796

    Zoodulcis
    Moderator

    Good morning, here is the citation I promised.  Unfortunately, this article is very hard to come by for people outside academia, which I was reminded of this morning.  In short, the researcher found that when a study participant was asked to ‘just relax’ his cardiovascular response went up, indicating stress.  But when asked to stroke his pet snake of 25 years ‘Beaux’, a common boa constrictor to whom he was extremely attached, his heart rate and blood pressure went down.  This old study is one of the few that takes the human-animal bond between herp owners and their pets seriously, unfortunately.  It is interesting that it points out what so many of us already know, that attachment to our animals yields all kinds of personal benefits.  The citation is:

    “RM and Beaux: Reductions in Cardiac Activity in Response to a Pet Snake” by Timothy Eddy, The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, September 1996. Volume 9, page 184.  Even if you never read this article, knowing waht it says makes for a good conversation topic at your next cocktail party or bar-b-que!